Research

Reports and Publications

Research papers, reports and articles discussing various Platform-7 events

Professor Andy Pratt, City University London

The Enigma that is Platform-7

Professor Pratt is an internationally acclaimed expert on the topic of the cultural industries. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, and an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences. He has held academic appointments at University College London (Bartlett School of Planning) and LSE (Geography, and Urban Research Centre), King’s College, London (Culture, Media and Creative Industries). He joined City University as Professor of Cultural Economy in 2013.

The focus of this project is not to evaluate the success or impact of the event/events that Platform-7 (P7) curate; rather it seeks to discover the ways of working, and future directions that P7 may take. We want to understand process and outcomes in a broader context. In this sense we are not interested in the audience, we bracket it out. Instead we look at the process and the impact on the artists and artistic practice. This marks out this piece of work, and makes it innovative in the perspective and approach from the normative concern with evaluation of outputs in the form of audience reaction.

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Glimmers of Hope: Image Eva Bachmann

Professor Maurice Biriotti, UCL & SHM-Productions

Re-imagining Market Research

Professor Maurice Biriotti is currently Professor of Medical Humanities and Enterprise in the University College London (UCL) and CEO of SHM Productions. Until 1996, Professor Biriotti was a full-time academic, holding posts at the Universities of Cambridge, Birmingham and Zurich. His company SHM is a specialist provider of business services, using deep insights into human motivation to help organisations solve complex human-centred problems.

Professor Biriotti and his SHM team were fascinated by the Re-imagining Ladies Tights project commissioned by Lonfon Borough of Lewisham during the summer 2013 and conducted the following case study.

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Ella and Tights Ball: Image Jason Wen

Professor Loretta Lees, University of Leicester

Art-led regeneration in Margate: learning from Moonbow Jakes Café and Lido Nightclub intervention (2012) Art and the Public Sphere, Vol 2. Issue 1-3, Intellect Books and Ixia.

Professor Lees is an urban geographer with research expertise in gentrification/urban regeneration, global urbanism, urban policy, urban public space, urban communities, architecture, urban social theory and the urban geographies of young people. Loretta joined the University of Leicester, Geography Department in September 2013. Previously she was a Chair in Human Geography at King’s College London (1997-2013).

This paper considers whether a new iconic landmark – the Turner Contemporary – is likely to be a successful vehicle for the regeneration of the English seaside town of Margate in Kent. It does so by looking at the socio-economic context of Margate, the evidence about top-down models of art-led regeneration, and the data collected in a bottom up arts initiative – Moonbow Jakes Café and Lido Nightclub intervention – which was opened at the same time as the Turner Contemporary in the Summer of 2011.

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Roanna Mitchell, University of Kent

Tape Measure – A Provocation

Dr Roanna Mitchell PhD is a movement teacher, movement director, writer and researcher. Her research, based at the University of Kent, examines the body politics involved in training for, and working in, the acting profession.Roanna regularly teaches at the University of Kent, the Central School of Speech and Drama, and Goldsmiths; she is also artistic director for Susie Orbach’s local-global initiative Endangered Bodies. Recent movement direction includes Richard Schechner’s performance installation Imagining O (2012) in collaboration with Benjamin Mosse, performed at the International Theatre Festival Kerala, India.

How technology makes our body its business: the shaping of the ‘good citizen’ from Jane Fonda to the Wii fit. A provocation following an Interactive installation, with a talk and open discussion by Roanna Mitchell,

Provocation for the Catford Tapescape: The Intervention I, 19.4.2012.

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Paul Halliday, Goldsmiths, University of London

Regarding Obsolecence

Paul Halliday is a photographer, film-maker and urbanist based at Goldsmiths, University London. He is the founding co-director of Urban Encounters, and curates an annual conference and seminar programme at Tate Britain. He is also a co-director of Photofusion based in Brixton. In 2012, his colour street portraits will be exhibited at the Horniman Museum as part of an exhibition on dress culture and he will publish three books on his London work, material cultures in urban spaces, and images from a global project about ‘nowhereness’.

In response to Deluge, artist Paul Halliday and sociologist Francisco Calafate Faria (see below) presented papers discussing obsolscence, waste and redundancy to an open audience at Tapescape Catford: The Intervention II, Regarding Obsolescence

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Deluge: Image Paul Halliday

Dr Francisco Calafate Faria,
Goldsmiths, University of London

Deluge: Disembowelling Black Boxes

Francisco Calafate-Faria is a researcher at the Department of Sociology in Goldsmiths, University of London. He recently did fieldwork research in the Brazilian city of Curitiba, on organisations of urban scavengers. He is now writing up his thesis looking at the value of waste and recycling through the critical lenses of environmental justice and urban political ecology. He has done research on recycling markets and on communities of skippers and squatters in London. In Portugal, where he lived before, he worked in local cultural policy and wrote for newspapers as well as for art exhibition catalogues.

In response to Deluge artist Paul Halliday and sociologist Francisco Calafate Faria presented papers discussing obsolscence, waste and redundancy to an open audience at Tapescape Catford

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Paul Halliday, Goldsmiths, University of London

A presentation to the City and Sea Symposium

Paul Halliday is a photographer, film-maker and urbanist based at Goldsmiths, University London. He is the founding co-director of Urban Encounters, and curates an annual conference and seminar programme at Tate Britain. He is also a co-director of Photofusion based in Brixton. In 2012, his colour street portraits will be exhibited at the Horniman Museum as part of an exhibition on dress culture and he will publish three books on his London work, material cultures in urban spaces, and images from a global project about ‘nowhereness’.

The idea of place is of particular interest to a number of knowledge traditions within the humanities, arts and social sciences; as is also the study of landscape. Both place and landscape studies are predicated on the notion of contestation, symbolic, political and economic struggles being part of the ongoing processes that define the politics of vision and the ideologies of what counts as a history of place. I have shown some images from an ongoing project in Margate, and from some earlier London portraits that are now hanging in a reclaimed café in Margate, and at this point I would like to invite [Platform-7 founder] John McKiernan a friend and colleague to join the discussion around the idea of ethnographic pixelation in relation to his arts project located close to the newly opened Turner Gallery. .

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Nikki by Paul Halliday photographed by Platform-7 through the dirty

cafe window using a cameraphone.

John McKiernan, Goldsmiths, University of London

Up The Line Remembrance

John McKiernan is the founder of Platform-7 Events and wrote this dissertation for the Centre of Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths, University of London, following the 2009 Up The Line performance intervention in Brockley & Ladywell Cemetery.

This document has been written as an enquiry into this experimental event created for Remembrance 2009. The objective was to ascertain whether an audience could be subtly engaged in a serious subject while being part of, what was for the majority, a unique experience. By observing the audience engaging with the performances’, and reviewing written feedback, this paper discusses how the event can be considered in the context of physical space, cognitive interpretation and future events.The paper begins with the motivations behind organising such an event, challenges the marketing of the remembrance poppy and discusses personal memory and how this informed the initial creation. .

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Harry Patch,

Image: unknown